cafe-worker

 

In the course of a normal day, we often have the most fleeting of interactions with people – the bus driver, the man or woman in the supermarket checkout, the person on the other end of the phone, the human behind the bank counter, the beggar on the street. All of these moments are opportunities to develop both loving kindness and presence (being in the moment, rather than elsewhere in your mind).

Sometimes you might find that you pay in the supermarket or on the bus without much thought to the person on the other end of the transaction. When this happens, it’s so easy to dismiss the other person as almost a machine, and in doing so, diminishing them to the extent where they can often feel like that.

The moment you go beyond that and really pay attention to the other person, you can achieve a moment of presence, and in doing so, move beyond the roles we’re taught and get so used to. It’s a win-win situation for you and the other person. You become more present the more often you repeat this behaviour and the other person feels more human and valued. Just try it and pay close attention as you do so – you’ll notice a flash of stillness inside you, an anointing of ¬†your inner divinity. It’s a nice feeling, it’s free and it’s available as often as you want it.

And it spreads – deep down inside, we all want to feel more reality and more value in our everyday lives. Simple acts of minor kindness can spread like wildlfire – when I was young, nobody seemed to ever say thank you to the bus driver as they were getting off. These days, lots of people do – particularly if the person in front of them just has. Little thongs mean a lot.

Mindfulness – being in and accepting the present – goes way beyond meditation and I’d like to write about the various ways it impacts on our lives in these blog posts. Meanwhile, there’s a walking Loving Kindness meditation in our free 9 day course, which you can access instantly here: http://abisti.com/register/EILNRe